Queer Transgender Hate Crime Awareness Equal Rights PRIDE PRIDE No Hate Suicide Prevention Depression Awareness Aspie Autistic Autism Atheist Diabetes Awareness Cancer Awareness Religious Freedom ≠ Freedom to Discriminate

wealthyhugepenis:

my favourite part of the bible is when Jesus said that 1 like = 1 Prayer

(via sorry)

cisyphus:

Slurs are not oppressive because they are offensive, they are oppressive  because slurs by nature of being slurs draw upon certain power dynamics  to remind their target of his/her/their vulnerability in a certain relation to power and as an extension of that, to threaten violence and exploitation of that vulnerability.

(via queer-punk)

fawun:

what the fuck is this kid on

fawun:

what the fuck is this kid on

(Source: jadensmithtweets, via pizza)

ultralorde:

what does ilysm mean??? i like your sick memes????

(via kawaiisavior)

Introduction to LGBT section of sacred-texts.com

“The Bible, the Qur’an, and Baha’i and Zoroastrian scriptures have a few passages which condemn homosexuality. An out of context interpretation of these passages has been used as justification for persecution of homosexuals, ranging from ridicule, exclusion, and attempts to alter behavior, to imprisonment and even execution. Typically these quotes are employed not because the entire range of scriptural injunctions are being applied consistently, but because the power structure needs cherry-picked scriptural justification for their actions.

Colonialism subsequently imposed this prejudice on a number of non-western societies which did not previously have this sort of persecution. Other major world religions, particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Shinto, don’t condemn homosexuals in their sacred texts, let alone mention the subject except in passing. This doesn’t mean that societies where these religions are dominant or practiced are (or are not) tolerant of LGBT people; simply that whatever discrimination or persecution may be present is not based on religious grounds.

Modern studies of the nature of gender have found that human sexual preference is innate; homosexuality occurs in hundreds of species; and gender and sexual behavior is a continuum rather than two compartmentalized poles. Psychologists no longer consider homosexuality a personality defect or mental illness.

There will always be some that prefer not to accept the findings of science. For instance, there are a handful of Christians who believe that the Earth is flat because the Bible refers to the ‘four corners of the Earth’. Some literalist Christians reject the Copernican solar system for similar scriptural reasons. However, many religions, even the most conservative, have shown a capability to incorporate advances in knowledge— for instance, astronomy, geology and biology—that were previously contradicted by, or simply unknown to, scripture and religious tradition. For instance, modern Roman Catholic doctrine states that scientific theories of cosmology, including the ‘Big Bang’, are not incompatible with the concept of a creation by the deity— this from the church that only recently lifted its pro forma censorship of the works of Galileo.

Values of tolerance and acceptance for others can be found at the core of all world religions. Many religious groups have not found it difficult to extend tolerance to LGBT people, even if this does not lead to acceptance within their religion, or sanctioning of same-sex unions or homosexual clergy. And most religious groups and people, across the spectrum, are opposed to violence against gays and other violations of their human and civil rights, regardless of their other beliefs on the subject.”

“The UN high commissioner for human rights shares her concerns about the state of human rights in the world today.


From Syria and Iraq, to Sri Lanka, Egypt, Ukraine and Gaza and Israel - accusations abound that human rights are violated.

Headlines and sharp rhetoric about war crimes and crimes against humanity seem so common that they raise this question: Are we as a global society in fact making progress in protecting human rights because of higher awareness, or are we actually heading in the wrong direction?

Perhaps no one is better equipped to answer this question than Navi Pillay, the highest official in the United Nations responsible for monitoring and investigating human rights abuses around the world.

Describing herself as the “moral voice” that the world created to speak “truth to power”, she is approaching the end of her term.

Asked about the situation in Gaza she says that even if Israel does not cooperate with the war crimes inquiry, her office can still conduct an investigation into human rights violations.

"Both sides [Israel and Hamas] were violating international humanitarian law and international human rights law, specifically the indiscriminate killing of civilians. International law is clear: You do not kill civilians …. Civilians in Israel, civilians in Gaza, children on both sides have a right to live."

Navi Pillay talks to Al Jazeera about the world’s conflicts, her legacy, and the state of human rights today.”

Tags: human rights

The need for safe spaces in the ‘gaybourhoods’ has decreased in current years as the acceptance for LGBTQ* people has increased

Tags: Hiroshima

jaclcfrost:

what you said was very sweet and means a lot to me but i am incapable of properly responding in any way besides “thank you so much aaaah” because i do not know how to accurately express the exact level of my gratitude to where you completely understand how much what you said meant to me without me getting even more emotional and looking like a fucking nerd: an autobiography

(via cringing)

owlmylove:

genderqueer/fluid individuals are in no way natural i mean their ability to be breathtakingly stunning in any and all genders pretty clearly points towards omniscient divinity

"Technology is usually fairly neutral. It’s like a hammer, which can be used to build a house or to destroy someone’s home. The hammer doesn’t care. It is almost always up to us to determine whether the technology is good or bad."

Noam Chomsky, answering a question from an 11-year-old named Honor on whether technology is always good. It’s the perfect answer, if you ask me.

Chomsky’s words come from Does My Goldfish Know Who I Am?, a collection of young people’s questions answered by great scientists and thinkers. It’s ample proof that many of our greatest questions are simple ones, and their answers delight minds both brilliant and new. 

Check out more great excerpts from the book at Brain Pickings.

(via jtotheizzoe)

(via jtotheizzoe)

aidamnpearce:

"fake gamer girl"

because i would totally spend 60 bucks on something i don’t want just so i can impress a boy and his penis 

(via shinigamiseyes)

Tags: cissexism

bukakeing:

when you’re forced to act nice with someone you hate

image

(via shinigamiseyes)

Tags: tw knives

humorking:

beyonce could be taking a shit right now 

(via silohouettes)